My work examines the intersectionality of personal and collective memory in relation to migration, historical narratives and the perception of time. Through a migration experience and historical context: negation, erasure, and radically different writings of history in relation with socialism and post-socialism, I explore the construction of personal and collective memory and oblivion. Overlaps of social and emotional, utopias of the past and personal microutopias, history and landscape. The experience of migration: geographical, historical and personal discontinuities are reflected in my works in several ways: from absence to repetition, from traces and palimpsest to transformations. Some of my works are conceived as time machines, and the problem of time, heterochrony and memory are involved in all of my work.

I am interested in intimate layers of history and the continuing presence of the past in the present. The construction of history always points to the present and with each new projection of the future emerges a new past, as Reinhart Koselleck writes. The remaking of the official history proves it. One history is erased, and the other emerges. The memory (and oblivion) politics mark areas of shade and visibility.